Key Stage 1 Maths assessment (end)

This framework is used to make an assessment at the end of the key stage 1 and not to track progress throughout the key stage. Maths is broken into three standards, each with 'pupil can' statements

  • Working towards the expected standard
  • Working at the expected standard
  • Working at greater depth within the expected standard

Example of the three standards can be found Here

MATHS
Working TOWARDS the expected standard
  • The pupil can demonstrate an understanding of place value, though may still need to use apparatus to support them
    (e.g. by stating the difference in the tens and ones between 2 numbers i.e. 77 and 33 has a difference of 40 for the tens and a difference of 4 for the ones;
    by writing number statements such as 35 < 53 and 42 > 36).
  • The pupil can count in twos, fives and tens from 0 and use counting strategies to solve problems
    (e.g. count the number of chairs in a diagram when the chairs are organised in 7 rows of 5 by counting in fives).
  • The pupil can read and write numbers correctly in numerals up to 100 (e.g. can write the numbers 14 and 41 correctly).
  • The pupil can use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20
    (e.g. 18 = 9 + ? ; 15 = 6 + ?)
  • The pupil can add and subtract a two-digit number and ones and a two-digit number and tens where no regrouping is required (e.g. 23 + 5; 46 + 20), they can demonstrate their method using concrete apparatus or pictorial representations.
  • The pupil can recall doubles and halves to 20 (e.g. pupil knows that double 2 is 4, double 5 is 10 and half of 18 is 9).
  • The pupil can recognise and name triangles, rectangles, squares, circles, cuboids, cubes, pyramids and spheres from a group of shapes or from pictures of the shapes
MATHS
Working AT the expected standard
  • The pupil can partition two-digit numbers into different combinations of tens and ones. This may include using apparatus
    (e.g. 23 is the same as 2 tens and 3 ones which is the same as 1 ten and 13 ones).
  • The pupil can add 2 two-digit numbers within 100 (e.g. 48 + 35) and can demonstrate their method using concrete apparatus or pictorial representations.
  • The pupil can use estimation to check that their answers to a calculation are reasonable (e.g. knowing that 48 + 35 will be less than 100).
  • The pupil can subtract mentally a two-digit number from another two-digit number when there is no regrouping required (e.g. 74 – 33).
  • The pupil can recognise the inverse relationships between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and work out missing number problems (e.g. ▢ – 14 = 28).
  • The pupil can recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables to solve simple problems, demonstrating an understanding of commutativity as necessary
    (e.g. knowing they can make 7 groups of 5 from 35 blocks and writing 35 ÷ 5 = 7;
    sharing 40 cherries between 10 people and writing 40 ÷ 10 = 4;
    stating the total value of six 5p coins).
  • The pupil can identify ⅓ , ¼ , ½ , ¾ and knows that all parts must be equal parts of the whole.
  • The pupil can use different coins to make the same amount
    (e.g. pupil uses coins to make 50p in different ways;
    pupil can work out how many £2 coins are needed to exchange for a £20 note).
  • The pupil can read scales in divisions of ones, twos, fives and tens in a practical situation where all numbers on the scale are given
    (e.g. pupil reads the temperature on a thermometer or measures capacities using a measuring jug).
  • The pupil can read the time on the clock to the nearest 15 minutes.
  • The pupil can describe properties of 2-D and 3-D shapes
    (e.g. the pupil describes a triangle: it has 3 sides, 3 vertices and 1 line of symmetry;
    the pupil describes a pyramid: it has 8 edges, 5 faces, 4 of which are triangles and one is a square).
MATHS
Working at greater depth the expected standard
  • The pupil can reason about addition
    (e.g. pupil can reason that the sum of 3 odd numbers will always be odd).
  • The pupil can use multiplication facts to make deductions outside known multiplication facts
    (e.g. a pupil knows that multiples of 5 have one digit of 0 or 5 and uses this to reason that 18 × 5 cannot be 92 as it is not a multiple of 5).
  • The pupil can work out mental calculations where regrouping is required
    (e.g. 52 – 27; 91 – 73).
  • The pupil can solve more complex missing number problems
    (e.g. 14 + ▢ – 3 = 17; 14 + ▢ = 15 + 27).
  • The pupil can determine remainders given known facts
    (e.g. given 15 ÷ 5 = 3 and has a remainder of 0, pupil recognises that 16 ÷ 5 will have a remainder of 1; knowing that 2 × 7 = 14 and 2 × 8 = 16, pupil explains that making pairs of socks from 15 identical socks will give 7 pairs and one sock will be left).
  • The pupil can solve word problems that involve more than one step (e.g. which has the most biscuits, 4 packets of biscuits with 5 in each packet or 3 packets of biscuits with 10 in each packet?). The pupil can recognise the relationships between addition and subtraction and can rewrite addition statements as simplified multiplication statements
    (e.g. 10 + 10 + 10 + 5 + 5 = 3 × 10 + 2 × 5 = 4 × 10).
  • The pupil can find and compare fractions of amounts
    (e.g. ¼ of £20 = £5 and ½ of of £8 = £4 so ¼ of £20 is greater than ½ of £8).
  • The pupil can read the time on the clock to the nearest 5 minutes.
  • The pupil can read scales in divisions of ones, twos, fives and tens in a practical situation where not all numbers on the scale are given.
  • The pupil can describe similarities and differences of shape properties (e.g. finds 2 different 2-D shapes that only have one line of symmetry; that a cube and a cuboid have the same number of edges, faces and vertices but can describe what is different about them).

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